David Seaman doesn’t think managers in modern game will stay at their clubs as long as Arsene Wenger has at Arsenal.

Arsène Wenger has outstayed yet another Premier League manager, after Ronald Koeman was sacked by Everton after a crushing defeat to the Gunners. At the age of 68, Wenger has been managing Arsenal for over 21 years now, but Seaman doesn’t think that’s likely to happen again at any club.

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“Football has changed, it’s changed to a results-based management. Before you used to get managers going into a club and making the youth team better and bringing the young players through, that sort of thing but now it’s all changed. It’s all results based,” said the former Arsenal goalkeeper to talkSPORT.

“Managers will know that now and that’s what they’ll expect. There never is a long-term job anymore. Arsène Wenger has been at Arsenal for years, but there aren’t many who keep their job for a long time now.”

A few years ago, you could’ve made the argument that some clubs like to hire and fire quickly, whilst others give their managers more of a chance to build success. Sir Alex Ferguson and Wenger belonging to clubs in the latter group, with most other managers at teams in the former.

However, in the past few years we’ve seen that even a club like United, willing to hire one manager for 27 years, aren’t immune to sacking coaches after only a season or two. It’s been four years since Ferguson left United and the club are on their third new manager already.

Arsenal could end up in the same way when Wenger leaves, and none of the other Premier League clubs have shown much of a commitment to their current bosses – bar Bournemouth with Eddie Howe.

Only Howe has lasted more than five years consecutively, having passed the five-year mark this month. Will he still be at Bournemouth in the year 2033? That’d be the only way he could catch Wenger’s current tenure. I’d say David Seaman is probably right to be doubtful.