Aaron Ramsdale has admitted being a footballer is hard but says he’s not looking sympathy as it’s also one of the best jobs in the world.

LEEDS, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 18: Aaron Ramsdale of Arsenal celebrates their team's third goal scored by Bukayo Saka (not in picture) during the Premier League match between Leeds United and Arsenal at Elland Road on December 18, 2021 in Leeds, England. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images)
LEEDS, ENGLAND – DECEMBER 18: Aaron Ramsdale of Arsenal celebrates their team’s third goal scored by Bukayo Saka (not in picture) during the Premier League match between Leeds United and Arsenal at Elland Road on December 18, 2021 in Leeds, England. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images)

Aaron Ramsdale wasted no time in making himself an Arsenal fans’ favourite when he was thrust into the first team after just three games last season.

Arriving with massive question marks over his head, Ramsdale quickly won over the majority of fans with his ability and his personality.

The Daily Mail, who have already seen Amazon’s Arsenal All or Nothing series that is released on 4 August and, from that, they have pulled out some snippets and then interviewed some Arsenal players about them.

First up is Ramsdale who was asked what he hoped fans would learn from the documentary.

Daily Mail interview with Aaron Ramsdale that reads: IT’S SO HARD TO BE A FOOTBALLER But Arsenal goalkeeper Aaron Ramsdale isn’t out for sympathy as he reveals highs and lows of top flight Daily Mail3 Aug 2022By ADRIAN KAJUMBA GETTY IMAGES He can handle it: Arsenal’s No 1 Aaron Ramsdale AARON Ramsdale hopes fans will gain an insight into how difficult it is to be a footballer through Arsenal’s All Or Nothing series. Goalkeeper Ramsdale, 24, believes the highs and lows make being a professional ‘ one of the best jobs in the world’ but also one of the most stressful. The Gunners opened their doors to an Amazon camera crew last season, granting them access to all areas of the club, players and some of their family environments during a rollercoaster campaign for the north Londoners. Asked what he hopes supporters will learn, Ramsdale said: ‘ How hard it is to be a footballer. One of the best jobs in the world, but one of the worst at the same time. ‘Don’t get me wrong, this isn’t me preaching like, “Oh, everyone feel sorry for us”, but the time away from families and kids, and living out of a suitcase, travelling. ‘The stress you put on yourself, the stress you have in terms of the fanbase. One weekend it’s the best job in the world and you are living on cloud nine and winning games, and the next week you lose against a team you shouldn’t lose to and it’s doom and gloom. ‘I just hope from what comes out they get to see that we are only human, and you get to see us enjoying ourselves but that at times we are suffering together. ‘That’s the hardest thing to get out. Everyone thinks football is easy, you are on the pitch for two or three hours and you go home, but it’s just not like that. ‘You are travelling 24/7, you are in the gym. Like I said it’s not me moaning saying we want some sympathy, it’s facts of the job.’ Ramsdale has first-hand experience of fanbase pressure and opens up in one of the first episodes about the well-documented social media abuse he received ahead of his £24million move from Sheffield United, which prompted him to turn off comments and notifications on his social media apps. The cameras also captured Ramsdale’s family at his Arsenal Premier League debut against Norwich, the footage highlighting the huge strain placed on them — in particular his dad Nick. At one stage Ramsdale’s father finds watching so nail-biting that he has to get away from the game and heads back into their corporate box at the Emirates to escape the tension. Ramsdale said: ‘Yeah, he hates it. Especially now. He tells me week in, week out to stop passing it into midfield because it gives him a heart attack. ‘In previous years it was the other way round. My mum was the one struggling, with losing and relegation and things — he knew the type of person I was, stronger than my mum thought. ‘Now it’s the other way, where I have a lot of responsibility on the ball and it gives him more of a heart attack than my mum, I believe he walks in and out of the box 24/7 throughout the game. ‘It’s definitely taxing on the families as well because my mood for the whole weekend will revolve around the game.’ or Nothing: Arsenal will launch on Prime Video tomorrow, with new episodes weekly.
Daily Mail interview with Aaron Ramsdale

“How hard it is to be a footballer,” Ramsdale said. “One of the best jobs in the world, but one of the worst at the same time.

“Don’t get me wrong, this isn’t me preaching like, “Oh, everyone feel sorry for us”, but the time away from families and kids, and living out of a suitcase, travelling.

“The stress you put on yourself, the stress you have in terms of the fanbase. One weekend it’s the best job in the world and you are living on cloud nine and winning games, and the next week you lose against a team you shouldn’t lose to and it’s doom and gloom.

“I just hope from what comes out they get to see that we are only human, and you get to see us enjoying ourselves but that at times we are suffering together.

LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 23: Aaron Ramsdale celebrates after teammate Bukayo Saka of Arsenal (not pictured) scored their sides second goal from the penalty spot during the Premier League match between Arsenal and Manchester United at Emirates Stadium on April 23, 2022 in London, England. (Photo by Catherine Ivill/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND – APRIL 23: Aaron Ramsdale celebrates after teammate Bukayo Saka of Arsenal (not pictured) scored their sides second goal from the penalty spot during the Premier League match between Arsenal and Manchester United at Emirates Stadium on April 23, 2022 in London, England. (Photo by Catherine Ivill/Getty Images)

“That’s the hardest thing to get out. Everyone thinks football is easy, you are on the pitch for two or three hours and you go home, but it’s just not like that.

“You are travelling 24/7, you are in the gym. Like I said it’s not me moaning saying we want some sympathy, it’s facts of the job.”

Ramsdale then went on to talk about his debut for Arsenal and how stressful that was for his family watching, particularly his father.

“Yeah, he hates it,” Ramsdale said. “Especially now. He tells me week in, week out to stop passing it into midfield because it gives him a heart attack.

“In previous years it was the other way round. My mum was the one struggling, with losing and relegation and things — he knew the type of person I was, stronger than my mum thought.

“Now it’s the other way, where I have a lot of responsibility on the ball and it gives him more of a heart attack than my mum, I believe he walks in and out of the box 24/7 throughout the game.

“It’s definitely taxing on the families as well because my mood for the whole weekend will revolve around the game.”

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