Arsenal confirmed three new arrivals for Mikel Arteta’s backroom staff in Carlos Cuesta, previously of Juventus, Andreas Georgson from Brentford and Miguel Molina previously of Atletico Madrid and they seem very impressive.

ST ALBANS, ENGLAND - FEBRUARY 19: Arsenal Manager, Mikel Arteta looks on during a Arsenal Training Session at London Colney on February 19, 2020 in St Albans, England. (Photo by Richard Heathcote/Getty Images)
ST ALBANS, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 19: Arsenal Manager, Mikel Arteta looks on during a Arsenal Training Session at London Colney on February 19, 2020 in St Albans, England. (Photo by Richard Heathcote/Getty Images)

Arsenal announced another three members of Mikel Arteta’s backroom staff at the end of last month as his master plan starts to form ahead of the new season.

There are some very good reasons to get excited about these three coaches as you can read below.

Carlos Cuesta

Carlos Cuesta gives directions in 2017, when he was coaching the Atlético de Madrid children's team.
Carlos Cuesta gives directions in 2017, when he was coaching the Atlético de Madrid children’s team.

A 24-year-old coach who was apparently travelling Europe seeking out his own personal Guardiola or Klopp as you can read in this excellent El Pais profile of him. He was the youngest coach at Atletico Madrid until 2018 and is very highly regarded.

Using his own savings, Cuesta has travelled Europe learning from different clubs and managers. He even spoke about Mikel Ateta after being granted access to Manchester City training sessions.

“On that visit I realised how important it is to surround yourself with the right people. Pep has a high-quality professional and human staff,” he said.

“I highlight Mikel Arteta. He will be a great coach,” he added. “He was also able to verify the importance of details in elite training sessions and in game analysis.

“Training is based on experience. I try to invest my money in meeting people who can help me improve, ”he says. The concept is simple: “Listen and improve.

“Travelling through different countries, environments, systems. Know how to adapt. I try to be a complete coach. I try to learn from everyone: Guardiola, Mourinho, Diego Martínez (Granada), Emery, Klopp … But also from Second B or Third coaches.

Andreas Georgson

Andreas Georgson
Andreas Georgson

Andreas Georgson joins Arsenal after leaving Brentford as their Head of Set Pieces and Individual Development. He worked with Malmö before that and the 38-year-old also has experience of bringing youngsters through clubs, although his free-kick expertise will grab all the headlines.

Speaking when he joined Brentford in 2019, Georgson said, “I have worked at Malmö FF for 14 years and have had several positions at the club: Head of Youth Scouting, Head of Methodology in the academy, Under-17 Head Coach and, for the last two years, Assistant Coach for the first team.

“I will finish the season with Malmo but then I am really looking forward to joining the team at Brentford in November and fighting for promotion to the Premier League over the coming years.”

He didn’t quite make it to a year before Mikel Arteta convinced him to join Arsenal.

Miguel Molina

Miguel Molina
Miguel Molina

Miguel Molina has, like Cuesta, previously worked for Atletico Madrid, and holds a degree in Sport and Exercise Science from the Polytechnic University of Madrid.

Speaking in an interview with true faith he explained his approach.

“From my experiences as a coach at Atlético de Madrid and from conversations with coaches at other academies (Villareal, Celta de Vigo, Real Madrid, Barcelona, Ajax, Bayern Munich, PSG, Schalke etc), I have arrived at the conclusion that the most important thing we do is develop an understanding of the footballer as a human being, how he relates with others in different contexts,” he said.

“From there we can then channel his behaviour to adapt to different situations. Our role as coaches, fitness coaches, assistants is to construct a methodological system of training that integrates and organises these characteristics with the aim of assimilating them to the team collective. By doing this the player takes on what we’re aiming to implement in a natural manner.”

Molina has also worked as a High Performance Academy Coach and has published at least two papers.

You can read “Methodological Analysis of the Decision-Making Process” or “Optimization of Individual Performance and Development of the Game Model: Analysis and Methodological Orientation,” here if that’s your thing.