Arsenal will have around 4,000 fans in Baku while Chelsea were only able to sell approximately 2,000 tickets for the Arsehole of Nowhere Final.

The Europa League trophy is displayed ahead of the competition's quarter-finals draw, on March 15, 2019 in Nyon. (Photo by Fabrice COFFRINI / AFP)
The Europa League trophy is displayed ahead of the competition’s quarter-finals draw, on March 15, 2019 in Nyon. (Photo by Fabrice COFFRINI / AFP)

It had long been rumoured that neither club would be able to shift their full allocation of 6,000 tickets despite how pathetic it was for UEFA to supply so few.

The problem is certainly not demand but rather one of logistics, cost, and time.

According to Bild, both clubs have sent around 6,000 tickets between them back to UEFA which will delight the governing body who can now smooze a few more corporate people who are much more agreeable than actual football fans.

Speaking about the issue, Arsene Wenger highlighted how the final being in Baku impacts fans far more than players (Henrikh Mkhitaryan aside.)

MONACO, MONACO - FEBRUARY 18: Arsene Wenger winner of the Laureus Lifetime Achievement award speaks on stage during the 2019 Laureus World Sports Awards at the Salle des Etoiles, Sporting Monte-Carlo on February 18, 2019 in Monaco, Monaco. (Photo by Simon Hofmann/Getty Images for Laureus)
MONACO, MONACO – FEBRUARY 18: Arsene Wenger winner of the Laureus Lifetime Achievement award speaks on stage during the 2019 Laureus World Sports Awards at the Salle des Etoiles, Sporting Monte-Carlo on February 18, 2019 in Monaco, Monaco. (Photo by Simon Hofmann/Getty Images for Laureus)

“It’s the same for both teams, always,” Wenger said. “A final is a final. The teams do not have such a problem. They live in ideal conditions, they have a private jet, they have nice business seats. It’s the fans [who will be affected].”

About the Mkhitaryan situation, he added, “That’s something that should not happen in football, in the modern world.

“[When] Politically, you cannot play a football game.”

So will he be watching? Of course he will. “I watch them like a fan,” he said. “I don’t judge. I’m happy when they win and not happy when they don’t play well. But after that I try to really take a distance with it.”

Previous articleMatteo Guendouzi meets with Alexis Claude-Maurice amid summer transfer rumours
Next articleStephy Mavididi explains his move from Arsenal to Juventus
Writer. Feminist. Dreamer. Gooner. Owner of DailyCannon.com, writing about Arsenal since 2008. Sometimes found in the Guardian, Vice.com & elsewhere talking queer issues, politics & football. If in doubt, assume sarcasm.