Former Arsenal physio, Gary Lewin, believes that the Premier League restart should be pushed back to June 26 at the earliest as players start to voice fears over injury concerns.

London, UNITED KINGDOM: Arsenal's Captain Gilberto Silva (C) hugs manager Arsene Wenger while team trainer Gary Lewin (R) looks on after he scored his second goal during the Premiership football match at The Emirates Stadium in London 02 December 2006. Arsenal won the game 3-0 with Gilberto getting two goals from the penalty spot. AFP PHOTO ADRIAN DENNIS
London, UNITED KINGDOM: Arsenal’s Captain Gilberto Silva (C) hugs manager Arsene Wenger while team trainer Gary Lewin (R) looks on after he scored his second goal during the Premiership football match at The Emirates Stadium in London 02 December 2006. Arsenal won the game 3-0 with Gilberto getting two goals from the penalty spot. AFP PHOTO ADRIAN DENNIS

With the Budesliga restarting this weekend, many wasted no time in calling for the Premier League to do the same despite the fact that what’s happening in Germany is simply not comparable to what’s going on in England.

The Premier League are desperate to get going lest they have to hand back some of their riches to the TV companies and seem prepared to put players and staff at risk to do just that.

“They are saying games started by June 12,” Lewin told the Mail on Sunday.

“You can’t come back with one and a half or two weeks of training. You need four to five weeks, especially if you’re going back into competition.

“You’re not playing friendlies, you’re playing to win. You need to do that preparation, you can’t just go straight in. Clubs are doing their best, but we’ve had a few meetings cancelled, even on Zoom, to talk about the restart.”

His comments followed after Raheem Sterling had highlighted his fears of picking up an injury after so long not playing or training properly.

Daily Mail 18 May 2020

“The time they’ll have in full-contact training before the first game is very limited,” Lewin added.

“There is a high risk of injury. Players are not being exposed to normal levels of mental, physical and neuromuscular work.”