We’ve been debating video technology for so long that we don’t even use video any more.

After another weekend that saw blunders from the referees chosen to take charge at the highest level of the game, calls have, once again, been made for the governing body to introduce technology to help them – namely, video tech.

It’s interesting to note that sports that are traditionally seen as ‘stuffy‘ or ‘old fashioned‘ such as tennis, cricket and rugby, have embraced video technology yet football continues to reject all attempts to drag it in to the 21st century.

On Tuesday, however, we saw something of a breakthrough as Greg Dyke, chairman of the FA, called for the use of video.

Dyke said

“In 20 years time we’ll say, ‘wasn’t it quaint we didn’t use video technology?

“If we’re going to do it sometime, why don’t we do it now? We are 100 per cent behind it at the FA. It’s going to come, it’s only a matter of when.

“I personally would start quite gradually. I would do game-changing moments – goals, sendings off and penalties. Possibly off-sides. The Dutch have got a system that can tell you instantly about off-sides.

“It’s only a matter of time. We’ve got to start doing this just to help referees. In a world of 35 cameras covering most games, it’s a bloody tough job.”

He seems to be facing an uphill battle, however, as UEFA also made an announcement that they are quite happy with things the way they are as Gianni Infantino, general secretary said when asked if he UEFA embrace the technology

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“Certainly not.

“There would be no mistaken identity with additional assistant referees because they would immediately see what happens and rectify it.

“It’s very easy to call for technology as soon as you a controversial action. What is needed is a proper debate.”

Yes, those useful two extra assistants who aren’t able to see incidents that happen right in front of them.

How many times have you seen one of them attempt to advise the referee or make a call?

That’s clearly the answer.

And as for a proper debate? The rest of the world has been having one for 20 years, you just aren’t listening.

Well done, UEFA.